Please report any broken links or trouble you might come across to the Webmaster. Please take a moment to let us know so that we can correct any problems and make your visit as enjoyable and as informative as possible.


NavSource Online:  Aircraft Carrier Photo Archive


Contributed by Scott Dyben.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-463357)

USS ENTERPRISE   (CV-6)
(later CVA-6 and CVS-6)


Click On Image 
For Full Size Image
Size Image Description Contributed
By And/Or Copyright
World War II

NS0206ao
143k

"Th[is] famous photo, [...], shows the crash site of a US Navy SBD with two crew members and also the crash of a Japanese Aichi Val dive bomber with two crew members. The two planes crashed next to each other because they were tightly engaged and one apparently struck the other, with no altitude to bail out, killing all four in both planes."

"The US Navy air crew were recovered later, however an Army patrol buried the badly burned Japanese air crew in an unmarked grave near the crash site and the location was lost due to the rough coral terrain. They are still there—PO2c Koreyoshi Sotoyama, pilot and radioman, Flyer 1c Hajime Murao."

LTCOL Claude A. Larkin, USMC, CO, MAG-21, later testified: "We saw one of these Enterprise airplanes and one Japanese airplane collide in the air. Both of them fell and burned a half mile south and east of Ewa." [ENS John H.L.] Vogt's SBD-2 [(6-S-3, BuNo 2160)] crashed near the intersection of Belt Road and Ewa Beach Road; neither Vogt nor Sid[ney] Pierce[, RM3c,] had gotten out. (Quoted from Steady Nerves and Stout Hearts, by Robert J. Cressman & J. Michael Wenger.)

"The crash site itself was also lost as decades later a golf course was constructed on the property after presumably all of the visible crash wreckage had been removed by the military."

"Using documents, maps, air photos, etc obtained from National Archives, I have been able to locate the crash area again as seen in the photo, which is near to the main golf country club building. In 1941 the area was a thick forest of Kiawe trees."

"This action was the largest air battle of the Pearl Harbor attack which actually took place over what is today known as Ewa, Oahu, near One'ula Beach. Army P-40B Warhawks shot down Japanese Aichi Vals while Japanese Zero's engaged several US Navy SBD's over the shoreline and what is today a golf course. Amazingly, one of the most famous photos of this air battle and resulting crashes was captured by an Army photographer in a passing B-17 attempting to land at Hickam Field."

"We believe that there should be a monument-marker placed there that describes this historic December 7, 1941 air battle and the names of the American and Japanese killed there in the crashes. I believe funds could be raised from US Veteran groups and in Japan for this marker-monument, with coordination by the US National Park Service."

"I know that people in Japan that I have been in contact with would also appreciate that Japanese pilots killed there that morning would also be remembered, which we hope will happen soon."

John Bond,
Ewa Battlefield Historian

NS020677
50k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) underway circa 1942, location unknown.

Robert Hurst
CV-6 Enterprise
NS0206as
228k

Enterprise's first damage of the war. On 1 February 1942 (local time, 31 January in CONUS), she and her air group attacked Japanese installations on the Marshall Islands, one of the first American offensives of the war. In response, five land-based Japanese Army Nell bombers counterattacked with bombs, one landing close enough to rupture a gasoline line and start a fire that caused the damage in this photo and wounded one sailor. Four of the bombers escaped the anti-aircraft fire of the still inexperienced gunners but one circled around for a second run and nearly hit the ship before crashing into the ocean—slicing off an SBD Dauntless' tail with a wing tip as it passed over the deck on its flight to a watery grave.

National Archives photo (# 80-G-271195).

Tracy White, Researcher @ Large

NS0206aaa
230k

A deck park of SBD Dauntless aircraft aboard the carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) on 4 March 1942, en route to raid Marcus Island. Note the individual aircraft numbers on both wings and old-style "red meatball" in the centre of the white star national markings on the wing, still carried at this date. Photo National Archives, College Park, Maryland.

Photo and text from Midway: Dauntless Victory, by Peter C. Smith.

Robert Hurst

NS0206aa
230k

Crewmen aboard the USS Enterprise (CV-6) rearming F4F-3 Wildcats after the strike against Marcus Island on 4 March 1942. Note the over-size stars then in vogue after the Pearl Harbor attack for easy recognition. Photo U.S. Navy.

Photo and text from "Aircraft Carriers," by Norman Polmar.

Robert Hurst
Doolittle Raid on Japan, April 1942

NS0538404
125k

USS Dunlap (DD-384) cuts close across the stern of USS Enterprise (CV-6) while operating at sea in the Hawaiian area, 8 April 1942, the day that Enterprise departed to take part in the Doolittle raid on Japan. SBD scout bombers of Bombing Squadron Six (VB-6) are being spotted aft on the carrier's flight deck. Official U.S. Navy photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (# 80-G-16958).

Joe Radigan

NS020657
111k

The aft end of Enterprise's island showing the base of her aircraft crane and both 1.1" antiaircraft gun mounts doing some target practice while escorting Hornet (CV-8) in route to launch Doolittle's B-25's. April 15th, 1942.

Steve Whitby

NS020698
142k

Douglas TBD-1 Devastator torpedo plane, of Torpedo Squadron Six (VT-6), approaches USS Enterprise (CV-6) to land, 4 May 1942. Note Landing Signal Officer at left.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (#80-G-17525).

Gerd Matthes, Germany

NS0206ai
79k

Lieutenant Commander Eugene E. Lindsey's Douglas TBD-1 Devastator torpedo-bomber (Bureau # 0370) sinking astern of the carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) after a deck landing accident on 28 May 1942. Plane guard destroyer, USS Monaghan (DD-354) is in the left background. Enterprise was then en route to the Midway area. LCDR Lindsey, Commanding Officer of Torpedo Squadron Six (VT-6), was flying out with the rest of the air group to join the ship when the crash took place. He, and the other members of the plane's crew, were rescued by Monaghan.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (#80-G-7744).

Naval History & Heritage Command

NS0535408
151k

Lieutenant Commander Eugene E. Lindsey, USN, Commanding Officer of Torpedo Squadron Six (VT-6) is assisted into a breeches bouy for transfer from USS Monaghan (DD-354) to USS Enterprise (CV-6) on 31 May 1942, while the ships were en route to the Midway area. Lindsey had been picked up by the destroyer on 28 May, after his TBD-1 Devastator torpedo-bomber had crashed attempting to land on the carrier. Aviation Radioman First Class Charles T. Granat is partially visible behind Lindsey, waiting his turn on the "high line." The other member of the plane's crew, Chief Aviation Pilot Thomas E. Schaeffer is standing with hands in pockets, just to left of the transfer group. Lindsey and Granat were killed in action attacking the Japanese fleet on 4 June 1942.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (#80-G-7748).

Joe Radigan
Battle of Midway, June 1942

NS020622
109k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) entering Pearl Harbor on 26 May 1942, following the Battle of Coral Sea and shortly before the Battle of Midway.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-66121).

Scott Dyben

NS020643
95k

Enterprise tied up at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, May 1942. Yorktown was across the harbor in drydock having damage from the Coral Sea battle repaired before Midway. Note the cage mast battleship (left background) left over from the Japanese attack on Dec. 7th, 1941.

Steve Whitby

NS020644
160k

Enterprise tied up at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, May 1942, just before Midway.

Details of the island, showing the large stack, searchlights, two cranes and numerous 20mm machine guns.

Steve Whitby
Larger copy and additional comments submitted by Gerd Matthes, Germany

NS020645
78k

Another view, as above.

Steve Whitby

NS020694
131k

Details of USS Enterprise's island, taken in May 1942 at Pearl Harbor. This shows the masthead CXAM-1 radar antenna; in the foreground are the two 1.1in (28mm.) quad AA mounts.

USN photo from "Aircraft Carriers of the U.S. Navy," by Stefan Terzibaschitsch.

Robert Hurst
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020606
71k

One of the rare photos of the Enterprise taken during the Battle of Midway.

USN

NS020619
67k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) steaming at high speed at about 0725 hrs, 4 June 1942, seen from USS Pensacola (CA-24). The carrier has launched Scouting Squadron Six (VS-6) and Bombing Squadron Six (VB-6) and is striking unlaunched SBD aircraft below in preparation for respotting the flight deck with torpedo planes and escorting fighters. USS Northampton (CA-26) is in the right distance, with SBDs orbiting overhead, awaiting the launch of the rest of the attack group. Three hours later, VS-6 and VB-6 fatally bombed the Japanese carriers Akagi and Kaga.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-32225).

Scott Dyben

NS020623
180k

Torpedo Squadron Six (VT-6) TBD-1 aircraft are prepared for launching on USS Enterprise (CV-6) at about 0730-0740 hrs, 4 June 1942. Eleven of the fourteen TBDs launched from Enterprise are visible. Three more TBDs and ten F4F fighters must still be pushed into position before launching can begin. The TBD in the left front is Number Two (Bureau # 1512), flown by Ensign Severin L. Rombach and Aviation Radioman 2nd Class W.F. Glenn. Along with eight other VT-6 aircraft, this plane and its crew were lost attacking Japanese aircraft carriers somewhat more than two hours later. USS Pensacola (CA-24) is in the right distance and a destroyer is in plane guard position at left.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-41686).

Scott Dyben
Larger copy submitted by Ron Reeves

NS020662
47k

"A squadron of Douglas Devastator torpedo bombers aboard the mighty Enterprise unfold their wings for the next take-off. In company with Battleship X, the Enterprise shows the Japs her power. Result: 30 by anti-aircraft and 33 by her planes."

From Our Navy magazine, mid-September 1943 issue.

Chester O. Morris

NS020564
131k

Aviation Ordnanceman Second Class Clifton R. Bassett, of Yorktown's Bombing Squadron Three (VB-3), is carried from the flight deck of USS Enterprise (CV-6), 4 June 1942. He had been wounded by Japanese aircraft while VB-3 was attacking Hiryu. Bassett was radioman/gunner of the SBD Dauntless scout-bomber flown by Ensign Bunyan R. Cooner, USNR, seen here at top center wearing an inflatable life jacket.

Photographed looking forward from the carrier's island. Note flight deck details, including wooden decking, metal tie-down strips, palisade and flight deck distance markings. Aircraft wheel chocks are piled at the right.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-7745).

NH&HC

NS020564a
154k

Aviation Ordnanceman Second Class Clifton R. Bassett, of Yorktown's Bombing Squadron Three (VB-3), is carried from the flight deck of USS Enterprise (CV-6), 4 June 1942. He had been wounded by Japanese aircraft while VB-3 was attacking Hiryu. Bassett was radioman/gunner of the SBD Dauntless scout-bomber flown by Ensign Bunyan R. Cooner, USNR, seen here walking to the right of the stretcher party.

Photographed looking forward from the carrier's island. Note flight deck distance markings and aircraft tie-down strips.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-7746).


NS020551
74.8Mb

"The Battle of Midway," directed by John Ford and narrated by Henry Fonda, is comprised mostly of authentic footage from the battle. This documentary, produced in 1942, won an Academy Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Award (Oscar). Then Commander (later Rear Admiral) John Ford, USNR, in civil life wrote, directed or produced more than 130 films in a career spanning four decades.

Format: MP4 (.mp4)  Duration: 18' 7"  Size: 320 x 240

Download a free MP4 player.

Another collection of footage taken by John Ford is available at Live Leak.

Courtesy of Internet Archive. Thanks to Ron Reeves for the clue.

NS0206aj
83k

CITATION

"The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Norman Jack Kleiss, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Scouting Plane of Scouting Squadron SIX (VS-6), embarked from the U.S.S. ENTERPRISE (CV-6), during the 'Air Battle of Midway,' against enemy Japanese forces on 4–6 June 1942. Participating in a devastating assault against a Japanese invasion fleet, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Kleiss, with fortitude and resolute devotion to duty, pressed home his attacks in the face of a formidable barrage of anti-aircraft fire and fierce fighter opposition. His gallant perseverance and utter disregard for his own personal safety were important contributing factors to the success achieved by our forces and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942).

Bill Gonyo
Guadalcanal Invasion; Battle of the Eastern Solomons, August 1942

NS0206al
232k

Photo of the first crash landing by one of the new Grumman torpedo bombers (TBF's) aboard the USS Enterprise (CV-6). It occurred July 23, 1942, when T-8, piloted by ENS R.J. Be, slid into catwalk on the port side of the flight deck aft of the island structure. The crash occurred while the Task Force was enroute to the Solomon Islands. Official US Navy photo.

Robert M. Cieri

NS020639
93k

Ordnancemen of Scouting Squadron Six (VS-6) load a 500 pound demolition bomb on an SBD scout bomber on the flight deck of USS Enterprise (CV-6), during the first day of strikes on Guadalcanal and Tulagi, 7 August 1942. Note aircraft's landing gear and bomb crutch; also bomb cart and hoist.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-10458).

(Note that the date printed on the photo is incorrect).

NHC

NS020633
149k

A Japanese bomb exploding on the flight deck of USS Enterprise (CV-6), just aft of the island, on 24 August 1942.

Note: According to the original photo caption, this explosion killed the photographer, Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Robert F. Read. However, Morison's "History of U.S. Naval Operations in World War II" (volume 5, page 97) states that Read was killed by the bomb that had earlier hit the after starboard 5"/38 gun gallery, which can be seen burning in the upper left. Morison further states that the bomb seen here exploded with a low order detonation, inflicting only minor damage.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-17489).

NHC

NS020633a
84k

Fighting fires in the ship's starboard after 5"/38 gun gallery, after it was hit by a Japanese bomb during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, 24 August 1942. Note firefighting foam on deck and displaced waterway covers. Collection of Admiral Thomas C. Kinkaid, USN.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command photograph (# NH 102095).

Gerd Matthes, Germany

NS020633b
113k

Crewmen fighting fires in the ship's starboard after 5"/38 gun gallery, after it was hit by a Japanese bomb during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, 24 August 1942. Note hole in the flight deck at the bottom of the photo, the result of another bomb hit. Collection of Admiral Thomas C. Kinkaid, USN.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command photograph (# NH 102096).

Gerd Matthes, Germany

NS020620
58k

A Japanese Type 99 carrier bomber (a type later code-named "Val") burns as it is shot down directly over USS Enterprise (CV-6). Note radar antenna atop the carrier's foremast, and anti-aircraft shell bursts overhead.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-31349).

Scott Dyben

NS0206apb
160k

View of the damage to the starboard quarter 5"/38 gun gallery aboard USS Enterprise (CV-6), resulting from a bomb that hit nearby during the battle of the Eastern Solomons, 24 August 1942. Photographed a few days later, after the ship had returned to port.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (# 80-G-K-411).

Gerd Matthes, Germany

NS0206apc
95k

Bulged flight deck structure aboard USS Enteprise (CV-6), resulting from a bomb that exploded below during the 24 August 1942 Battle of the Eastern Solomons. Photographed a few days later, after the ship had returned to port. Note the Atlanta (CL-51) class light cruiser in the background.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (# 80-G-K-412).


NS0206apd
113k

Flight deck damage aboard USS Enterprise (CV-6), caused by a bomb explosion during the 24 August 1942 Battle of the Eastern Solomons. Photographed a few days later, after the ship had returned to port.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (# 80-G-K-413).


NS0206ap
144k

Damage in the ship's after starboard 5"/38 gun gallery, received when a Japanese bomb hit there during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons on 24 August 1942. Photographed at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 10 September 1942.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Forrestal Collection, 1975 (# NH 83991).


NS0206apa
106k

Near-miss bomb damage to the ship's port quarter, received during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons on 24 August 1942. Note degaussing cables torn from their mountings, just below the deck edge, and the dished-in hull plating at and below the waterline. Photographed in drydock at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 10 September 1942.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Forrestal Collection, 1975 (# NH 83992).

Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 1942
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020607
122k

Photo taken on October 26, 1942 shows Enterprise smoking from her second bomb hit of the day while twisting and turning to avoid more Japanese bombs.

USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020607a
114k

A TBF-1 Avenger from Torpedo Squadron (VT) 10 prepares for launch from the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, 26 October 1942. The sign visible beyond the plane's landing gear (right) reads "PROCEED WITHOUT HORNET," indicating that USS Hornet (CV-8) was heavily damaged and the Big E's strike was not to wait to join up with Hornet's aircraft. The sign to the left reads "JAP 'CV' SPEED 25 AT 0830," indicating the last known speed of the Japanese carrier the Avenger was assigned to attack.

National Naval Aviation Museum photo # 1996.488.005.001.

Robert Hurst
CV-6 Enterprise
NS0206ac
33k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) during the Battle of Santa Cruz. Official U.S. Navy photo.

(Thanks to Gordon Bjorklund, who identified the photo.)

Steve Singlar
ETCS USNR-ret.
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020610
74k

As seen from USS South Dakota (BB-57), Enterprise is the prime target of Japanese pilots.

USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020611
105k A "Val" dive bomber goes down in flames as the Enterprise is near-missed. USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020634
128k

U.S. Navy ships firing at attacking Japanese carrier aircraft during the battle, 26 October 1942. USS Enterprise (CV-6) is at left, with at least two enemy planes visible overhead. In the right center is USS South Dakota, firing her starboard 5"/38 secondary battery, as marked by the bright flash amidships.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-20989).

NHC
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020635
103k

A Japanese bomb explodes off the port side of USS Enterprise (CV-6) during the action, 26 October 1942.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-30198).

NHC

NS020678
59k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) at Noumea, New Caledonia, 10 November 1942, while the Big E was undergoing repairs after the Battle of Santa Cruz. The following day she recovered her air group and departed Noumea to take part in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal (12–15 November 1942), the final major Japanese attempt to reinforce their garrison on the contested island.

Robert Hurst

NS020678a
90k

NS020693
252k

The Presidential Unit Citation presented to the USS Enterprise (CV-6).

Charles F. Hansen, son of Harold F. Hansen, QM2c, U.S. Navy
1943

NS020690
204k

With the VF-10 banner draped as a backdrop, the "Grim Reapers" pose at the end of their first war cruise, October 1942–February 1943, aboard USS Enterprise (CV-6). Note 43 "kill" markings.

Second from left (middle row, NS020690) and third from left (front row, NS020690a) is then LT(JG) Roy Marlin "Butch" Voris, a Navy fighter "ace" during WW2 and who was selected in 1946 to form, develop, train and lead the Navy Flight Exhibition Team (shortly to be named the "Blue Angels").

Courtesy of Hank Nothhaft, "First Blue Angel" (son-in-law of CAPT Roy M. "Butch" Voris)

NS020690a
211k

NS020636
87k

F6F Hellcat fighters taxiing forward on the flight deck, during training exercises, 2 July 1943. Another F6F is in flight overhead, with its landing gear and tail hook extended.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-74510).

NHC

NS020695
355k

Enterprise – CV 6. From U.S. Naval Ships & Aircraft (ONI 54-R), condensed and printed for FM 30-50, NAVAER 00-80V-57 (Recognition Pictorial Manual of Naval Vessels). Supplement 4 - 4 August 1943.

Gerd Matthes, Germany

NS020695a
332k

NS020699
89k

Puget Sound Navy Yard, 21 October 1943, after her mid-war overhaul. Broadside view, starboard side. Photo # 2823-43 (Bureau of Ships photo # 52945).

David Buell

NS020696
155k

Underway photo of USS Enterprise (CV-6). Exact date and location are unknown, but it was probably taken circa October 1943, after her mid-war overhaul at Bremerton, Wash. U.S. Bureau of Ships photo, via the National Archives (#19-N-60135).

David Buell

NS020618
125k Circa 1943-44. Place unknown. Author unknown. John N. Egeland, Jr.

NS020684
201k

Official US Navy photograph of USS Enterprise (CV-6) underway, circa 1943–1944, location unknown.

Robert M. Cieri

NS020684a
127k

Photo NS020684 was also published with this caption:

"U.S.S. ENTERPRISE
Six times 'SUNK' by Japs
Admiral Halsey's flagship from early days of Pearl Harbor till end of bloody invasion of Okinawa.
Claimed sunk six times she has the enviable record of 911 Jap aircraft shot down and 71 enemy ships sunk by her pilots.
Has won the Presidential Unit Citation.
Official U.S. NAVY PHOTO."

Tommy Trampp
Gilbert and Marshall Islands Operations, November-December 1943

NS020637
65k

Crash landing of F6F-3, Number 30 of Fighting Squadron Two (VF-2), into the carrier's port side 20mm gun gallery, 10 November 1943. Lieutenant Walter L. Chewning, Jr., USNR, the Catapult Officer, is climbing up the plane's side to assist the pilot from the burning aircraft. The pilot, Ensign Byron M. Johnson, escaped without significant injury. Enterprise was then en route to support the Gilberts Operation. Note the plane's ruptured belly fuel tank.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-205473).

NHC

NS020638
126k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) underway on 24 November 1943, while supporting the Gilberts Operation. Photographed from USS Monterey (CVL-26).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-366884).

NHC

NS020624
94k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) landing aircraft while supporting the Gilberts Operation, 22 November 1943. A TBM "Avenger" torpedo plane is on the flight deck, aft, while another is flying overhead.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-333207).

Scott Dyben
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020601
91k

December 11, 1943, one week after the raid on Kwajalein. She is wearing Measure 21 camouflage (Navy Blue on vertical surfaces; Deck Blue on horizontal surfaces). Numerous 20-mm/70-cal Oerlikon and 40-mm/56-cal Bofors AA guns had been installed during her July-October refit; her old Mk.33 directors had been replaced by Mk.37's with Mk.4 radar (see NS020667).

USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS021226
246k

The second Fighting Two squadron (VF-2), "Rippers," later "Tall Dogs," was established on 1 June 1943. It made two combat deployments, one aboard USS Enterprise (CV-6), November 1943–January 1944, and one aboard USS Hornet (CV-12), March–September 1944. Its first commanding officer, and leading ace, was Commander William A. Dean. VF-2 was disestablished on 9 November 1945.

David LaMar Berrey was a pilot between 1943–1944. His brother, Boyd Berrey, also served on the Hornet and trained with "Pappy" Boyington in 1941.

Joan Rands, daughter of David LaMar Berrey
1944

NS0206af
178k

Pilots of Bombing Squadron (VB) 10 gathered on the flight deck of carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) in January 1944. Photo courtesy of the National Naval Aviation Museum.

Bill Gonyo

NS0206afa
171k

Pilots of Torpedo Squadron (VT) 10 gathered on the flight deck of carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) in January 1944. Photo courtesy of the National Naval Aviation Museum.

Bill Gonyo
Marshall Islands and Truk, February 1944

NS020646
90k

Good shot of the island and Enterprise's new F6F-3's on the flight deck ready for strikes against the Marshall Islands, February 3rd, 1944.

Steve Whitby

NS020625
91k

Grumman F6F-3 "Hellcat" fighters landing on USS Enterprise (CV-6) after strikes on the Japanese base at Truk, 17-18 February 1944. Flight deck crewmen are folding planes' wings and guiding them forward to the parking area. The original caption gives date as 16 February.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-59314).

Scott Dyben
Landings on Emirau Island, March 1944
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020604
101k As part of Task Force 36.1, the ship is seen from one of her just launched planes as she was in the process of launching an air strike against Emirau in the Bismarck Archipelago, 20 March 1944. USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020605
107k Another shot of the ship on her way to provide air cover and close support to the Emirau Island raid. This photo was taken by one of her own planes as it sped by the carrier, yet the focus is perfect; 20 March 1944. USN

NS020667
50k

The "Big E" had her island modified during her July-October 1943 refit. Note new platforms on both the navigation and flag bridges, for better visibility, and Mk.37 dual purpose director (with Mk.4 radar antenna) in place of her former Mk.33. Photo taken on March 20, 1944 from one of her own planes.

Steve Whitby

NS020686
86k

USN photo of USS Enterprise (CV-6) underway at high speed while engaged in raids against Palau during March-April of 1944. She is painted in Measure 21 and her radar equipment consists of SK, SC-2 and SM sets.

Robert Hurst
Mid-1944

NS020600
88k

A Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless of VB-10 rolls along the flight deck of USS Enterprise (CV-6) into the sun, spring 1944. USN photo.

From "Carrier Air War in Original WWII Color," by Robert Lawson and Barrett Tillman.

Robert Hurst

NS020626
115k

TBM Avenger torpedo bombers warming up on the after flight deck during operations in the Pacific, circa May 1944. An F6F Hellcat fighter is on the midships elevator, in the foreground. The original Kodachrome color transparency was received by the Naval Photographic Science Laboratory on 29 May 1944.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-K-1590).

Scott Dyben

NS020687
117k

Two Air Group Ten SBD Dauntlesses overfly USS Enterprise (CV-6), probably in June 1944.

Robert Hurst

NS0206ah
80k

S1/c Clemens S Wittlieff served aboard USS Enterprise (CV-6), L Division, June 1944–June 1946. His 20mm gun was on the starboard side along the superstructure, 3rd gun in. He always said that his placement was where the crane was located prior to the 1943 refit.

Mark M Wittlief, son of Clemens S Wittlieff
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020602
129k

The Big E shows her late-war appearance and new dazzle camouflage (Measure 33/4Ab) in these 2 August 1944 photos, taken as she departed Pearl Harbor. According to Ms. 33 specifications, colors should be pale gray, haze gray and navy blue but, judging from existing photographs, it seems possible that, in fact, dull black or blue/black were substituted for navy blue.

On photo NS1201125101 note PC-1251 is passing Enterprise on the port side. The PC, which had arrived in Pearl Harbor just a few weeks earlier, is painted in a dark color but her mast, painted in light gray above the top of the stack, is reminiscent of Measure 1, which had been officially discontinued in September 1941 (!). (Photo from U.S. Aircraft Carriers: An Illustrated Design History, by Norman Friedman.)

(Thanks to Robert Hurst, who provided additional info).

USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020602a
185k National Archives photo # NA-19-N-71787.

Submitted by Robert M. Cieri
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020658
155k Steve Whitby
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020659
115k Steve Whitby
CV-6 Enterprise
NS1201125101
274k Robert Hurst
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020602b
185k David Buell
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020688
119k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) departs Pearl Harbor, mid-August 1944, with her newly applied dazzle camouflage and new Air Group 20 aboard.

Robert Hurst
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020640
94k

Anchored off Saipan, circa mid-1944, while painted in camouflage Measure 33, Design 4Ab. The photograph was taken from the flight deck of an escort carrier (CVE).

Courtesy of Don S. Montgomery, USN (Retired).

U.S. Naval Historical Center photograph (# NH 97266).

NHC
1945
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020641
87k

Landing Signal Officer, Ensign R. J. Grant, guides in an F6F "Hellcat" fighter, during flight operations on 13 March 1945. Taken by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class W.T. Stillman.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-319008).

NHC
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020668
69k

Damaged TBM Avenger, March 1945. The outlined arrow on the tail ("G" symbol) was not the design assigned by the Bureau of Aeronautics, but the ship's CO, CAPT Hall, believed it reduced aircraft visibility during night operations, at a time when his ship was operating as a night carrier.

Steve Whitby
Okinawa, April-May 1945
CV-6 Enterprise
NS0409518
83k

USS Enterprise (CV-6), at left, under attack by a Japanese suicide plane, during operations off Okinawa on 11 April 1945. She was hit and damaged on this day, but returned to action in early May following repairs made at Ulithi. At right is USS Oakland (CL-95), which is opening fire on the diving plane. Note tracer shells streaking across the upper part of the image.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-315762).

Tom Bateman
Kamikaze attack, May 1945
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020608
69k Photo taken on May 14, 1945, from the USS Washington (BB-56), shows the Enterprise exploding from a bomb laden kamikaze. The ships forward elevator was blown approximately 700 feet into the air from the force of the explosion six decks below. USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020608a
100k

Parts of Enterprise's elevator may be seen after being blown high over the carrier after she was hit by a Zeke with a 551-pound bomb on 14 May 1945. This photograph was taken from Bataan (CVL-29).

USS Enterprise CV 6 Serial 0273. Action Report of USS Enterprise (CV6) in Connection with Operations in Support of Amphibious Landings at Okinawa 3 May to 16 May 1945—Phase III. 22 May 1945, p. 28.

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020609
101k May 14, 1945. This shows the elevator pit after the elevator was blown out and fires were being extinguished. USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020612
56k Another view of the Enterprise being struck by a kamikaze on May 14, 1945. While a bit grainy, the extent of the explosion is still evident. USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020612a
148k

Crew fights fires after the Kamikaze crash, 14 May 1945.

Gerd Matthes, Germany

NS020647
111k

Bulged flight deck from a Kamikaze strike on the forward elevator, blowing it 400' in the air. This finished CV-6's combat career. She was sent back to Puget Sound for major repairs.

Steve Whitby

NS020664
67k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) transferring casualties to USS Bountiful (AH-9) on 15 May 1945, a day after the carrier had been hit by a kamikaze in the vicinity of the forward elevator.

Collection of Admiral Arleigh A. Burke, donated in 1973–75.

Naval History & Heritage Command photograph, # NH 99384-A, cropped from photo # NH 99384.

NHC

NS020664a
64k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) transferring casualties to USS Bountiful (AH-9) on 15 May 1945, a day after the carrier had been hit by a kamikaze in the vicinity of the forward elevator.

Collection of Admiral Arleigh A. Burke, donated in 1973–75.

Naval History & Heritage Command, photo # NH 99384 (see also NS020664).

Gerd Matthes, Germany

NS0206ak
195k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) anchored off Puget Sound Navy Yard in June 1945, preparing for dry docking and repairs from kamikaze damage occurring on May 14th. The ship appears to be off loading ammunition at the stern, while crew members are boarding the ferry City of Sacramento at the bow. The forward elevator is conspicuous in its absence, as it was destroyed in the May 14th attack.

Courtesy of the US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No.1996.488.272.027.

Mike Green
CV-13 Franklin
NS021353a
.PDF file
Get Adobe Reader
Get FREE Adobe Reader
68k

"Story of Phil and Hal Smith, two brothers aboard USS Enterprise and USS Franklin," by Dixie Smith.

Brenda Mullen, daughter of Dixie Smith, niece of Phil and J. Harold "Hal" Smith

NS020697
60k

V-J announcement.

Tracy White, Researcher @ Large

NS020697a
69k

NS020697b
52k
Post-War
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020665
103k

"Aircraft Carrier Enterprise."  (From a Russian publication).

Basically, this drawing shows the "Big E" after her 1945 refit, at the very end of the war. However, 40-mm gun mounts forward of the forward pairs of 5" guns were actually two quads and two twins (see below, 020627). Also, the 20-mm battery shown is too large, and is actually closer to that fitted during the ship's July-October 1943 refit.

Alex Tatchin
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020665a
111k

Deck plan and side elevation depicting USS Enterprise (CV-6) as she appeared at the end of the war, in September 1945, but the drawings show the wrong number of 20 mm and 40 mm AA guns. Recent research indicates the exact number and position of AA guns, which has been marked by arrows in the plan view. The final radar equipment of this ship included SK and SP (on the mast platform), and SC-2 (on the stack).

Robert Hurst
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020631
112k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) making 20 knots during post-overhaul trials in Puget Sound, Washington, 13 September 1945.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives (photo # 19-N-89185).

NHC
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020631a
81k

USS Enterprise, painted in Measure 21, cruising off Puget Sound, 13 September 1945. Two 40mm quad mounts are installed in the positions where the outriggers for the hangar catapults had formerly been fitted, and two forward twins (port and starboard) have been replaced by quads (USN photo).

Robert Hurst
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020631b
159k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) making 20 knots, in Puget Sound, Washington, 13 September 1945.

National Archives & Records Administration (NARA) photo, # 19-N-89188.

Mike Green
CV-3, CV-6, CV-12 and CVL-30
NS020632
116k

Naval Air Station, Alameda, California — Four aircraft carriers docked at the Air Station's piers, circa mid-September 1945. The ships are (from front to back): USS Saratoga (CV-3), USS Enterprise (CV-6), USS Hornet (CV-12) and USS San Jacinto (CVL-30). Note PBY amphibians parked at the far left.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-701512).

Note that four, out of five, classes of fast Aircraft Carriers that fought in the Pacific (only the one-ship class Wasp is missing) are represented in this photograph.

NHC

NS020685
42k

Gordon G. Buttars comments: "My father, an Enterprise veteran had a large framed 16 x 20 copy of this photo hanging in his home. [...] Behind the picture was a note that must have come with the photograph stating [... it was] taken in [late] September 1945 enroute to the Panama Canal."

Although details in this copy of the photo are not clear enough, it appears that a twin Bofors gun is absent from Big E's bow. It had been installed in 1943 and was removed during her last refit, June–September 1945, as weight compensation for guns added elsewhere. This agrees with Gordon's comment.

Robert Hurst
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020614
166k Overhead view of the ship in her final days in the Pacific Ocean as she heads for the Panama Canal. USN
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020615
89k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) en route to New York to take part in the Navy Day Fleet Review, October 1945. She is steaming in company with a light carrier (CVL) —in the right distance— and another warship.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-K-6576).

Scott Dyben

NS020627
133k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) steams toward the Panama Canal on 10 October 1945, while en route to New York to participate in Navy Day celebrations.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-701166).

Scott Dyben

NS0206at
44k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) passing through the Panama Canal, (apparently) in October 1945

Courtesy of the Panama Historical Society, via Ron Armstrong

NS020671
86k

Moored to Pier 26 North (Hudson) River, New York, second half of October 1945.

Photo probably taken by Anita Russell. Submitted by her daughter, Amy Cohen

NS020683a
104k

An outstanding photo of USS Enterprise (CV-6) as she makes her way up the lower Hudson River on the early morning of 17 October 1945, on her way to an anchorage for the 27 October Navy Day Victory celebration. This is an AP Wirephoto. Somewhat grainy, but that adds to the dramatic look of this photo, with the city of New York silhouetted in the background.

David Buell

NS020683f
68k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) is seen on 17 October 1945, being assisted by tugs to her appointed mooring spot in the Hudson River for the upcoming Navy Day Celebration.

United States National Archives, photo # 80-G-K-6557.

Mike Green

NS020683
108k

Photo taken on or about 27 October 1945 in the Hudson River, during Navy Day celebrations.

David Buell

NS020683b
75k

USS Enterprise (CV-6) anchored in the Hudson River, off New York City, at the time of the Navy Day Fleet Review, circa late October 1945.

Collection of Warren Beltramini, donated by Beryl Beltramini, 2007.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph (# NH 105563).

NHC (thanks to Chuck Haberlein)

NS020683c
62k

USS Enterprise (CV-6), off New York City, 27 October 1945.

Gary Schreffler

NS020683d
83k

NS020683e
4.74Mb

Family film, 16mm color footage of Navy Day 1945, taken from Riverside Drive in New York City. The film was probably shot by Thomas A. Woolsey, Kris's grandfather.

Format: M4V (.m4v)  Duration: 41"  Size: 480 x 272

Kris Woolsey
CV-6 Enterprise
NS0206ag
102k

"(NY15--Nov.26)--'BIG E' LOADED WITH TROOPS BOUND FOR U.S.A.--The famed U.S. carrier Enterprise, the rails of her flight deck jammed with returning servicemen, prepares to put out from Southampton, England, Nov. 23, bound for New York City, N.Y., where she is due Nov. 29. The veteran Pacific flattop is making her first Atlantic crossing since conversion as a troop-carrier. (AP wirephoto)(wb21600lon.) 1945"

David Buell
CV-6 Enterprise
NS020613
108k Shown here leaving Southampton, England on December 17, 1945. USN

For more photos of this ship, see:

Main
Photo Index
Aircraft Carrier
Photo Index Page

Comments, Suggestions or Image submissions, E-mail Carrier Information
Problems and site related matters, E-mail Webmaster

This page was created and is maintained by Fabio Peña
All pages copyright NavSource Naval History

Last update: 20 August 2017