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NavSource Online: Aircraft Carrier Photo Archive


Courtesy of CAPT Gene Oleson, CHC, USN (Ret)
(bluejacket.com)

USS HORNET   (CV-8)


Unit Awards, Campaign and Service Medals and Ribbons



Precedence of awards is from top to bottom, left to right
Top Row: American Defense Service Medal ("Fleet" clasp)
2nd Row: American Campaign Medal / Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal (4 stars) / World War II Victory Medal

Task Force 16 Citation
Enterprise, Hornet, 16 other ships and their 10,000 sailors, airmen and Marines, who took part in the Doolittle raid in April 1942, were officially recognized for their daring exploit 53 years later, on 15 May 1995. In a ceremony at the Pentagon they were presented the Task Force 16 Citation by the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. John H. Dalton.


Yorktown (modified) Class Aircraft Carrier
Ordered Laid down Launched Commissioned Decommissioned Stricken
30 Mar 1939 25 Sep 1939 14 Dec 1940 20 Oct 1941   13 Jan 1943
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News, Va.

Fate: Hit and immobilized by Japanese carrier aircraft bombs and torpedoes, 26 October 1942 (Battle of the Santa Cruz islands). Two planes made suicide runs: one glanced off the stack and plunged through the flight deck; the second crashed into the port forward gun gallery. Cruiser USS Northampton (CA-26) made three attempts to take the carrier in tow, but the towing line failed and additional Japanese attacks frustrated these efforts. Hornet was hit again and had to be abandoned. Destroyers USS Mustin (DD-413) and USS Anderson (DD-411) tried to scuttle her with torpedoes and 5" gunfire, but had to retire as enemy forces closed in. Hornet was finally scuttled by Japanese destroyers Makigumo and Akigumo with four 24" torpedoes, early on October 27. In all, she took two planes, 7-8 bombs, 16 torpedoes and an unknown number of 5" shells.

One hundred and eleven of her crew were lost with the ship and remain on active duty.


Specifications
(As built, 1941)
Displacement: 19,900 tons standard; 25,600 tons full load
Dimensions (wl): 761' x 83.25' x 28' (full load)  /  232 x 25.4 x 8.5 (full load) meters
Dimensions (max.): 824.75' x 114'  /  251.4 x 34.7 meters
Armor: 4"-2.5" belt; 60 lbs protective deck(s); 4" bulkheads; 4" (side)-2" (top) conning tower; 4" (side) over steering gear
Power plant: 9 boilers (400 psi); steam turbines; 4 shafts; 120,000 shp
Speed: 32.5 knots
Endurance (design): 12,500 nautical miles @ 15 knots
Armament: 8 single 5"/38 gun mounts; 4 quad 1.1"/75 machine gun mounts; 24 .50-cal machine guns
Aircraft: 90+
Aviation facilities: 3 elevators; 2 flight-deck and 1 hangar-deck hydraulic catapults
Crew: 2,919 (ship's company + air wing) (wartime figure)
Click on Thumbnail
for Full Size Image
Size Image Description Source
Pre-War
CV-8 Hornet
NS020840
260k

Hornet under construction, Wednesday, 3 January 1940.

NS020840: Looking forward.

NS020840a: Looking aft.

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020840a
293k
CV-8 Hornet
NS020841
93k

Hornet (CV-8) under construction, looking quarter stern, Newport News & Dry Dock Co., 3 March 1941.

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020843
122k

Hornet (CV-8) under construction, 36" searchlight platform looking aft, Newport News & Dry Dock Co., 4 August 1941.

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020844
214k

"The U.S.S. Hornet, Navy's newest aircraft carrier which was commissioned last October [1941]. She is the last word in seagoing airports."

Photo dates from 13 October 1941, while fitting out at Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.

Dan Wilmes, for his father Robert Wilmes, USS Dawn (IX-186)
CV-8 Hornet
NS020857
118k

"Newest Carrier Commissioned"

"Norfolk, Va.—The Navy's seventh and newest aircraft carrier, the Hornet, as she put into Norfolk Navy Yard for commissioning ceremonies after short trip from Newport News, Va., yards where she was built."

Acme Photo, 20 October 1941.

Tommy Trampp
CV-8 Hornet
NS020804
86k USS Hornet just after commissioning, 20 October 1941. She was painted in Measure 12 camouflage. Armament and radar had yet to be fitted. Mk.37 directors on the island differentiated her from her older sisters Yorktown and Enterprise, fitted with Mk.33 directors. (Thanks to Robert Hurst, who provided additional info). USN
CV-8 Hornet
NS020801
247k As completed, 27 October 1941. Image # 80-G-463613. National Archives
CV-8 Hornet
NS020842
205k

USS Hornet (CV-8) in dry dock at the Norfolk Navy Yard, 19 November 1941, being inspected for any defects on her hull during her shakedown, a month after being commissioned into the U.S. Navy.

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020803
99k

USS Hornet (CV-8) photographed circa late 1941, soon after completion, probably at a U.S. east coast port. Note flight deck overhang and large crane stowed in the small boat area. A ferry boat and "Eagle Boat" (PE) are in the background.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph (# NH 81313).

NHC
CV-8 Hornet
NS020835
104k

Line drawing ©Jean Secardin.

©Jean Secardin
World War II
CV-8 Hornet
NS020831c
160k

USS Hornet (CV-8), closeup view, starboard side in way of island, showing new 20mm battery, Mk-4 (FD) radar on forward Mk-37 director, new rig for fueling at sea, hose, etc. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., Saturday, 28 February 1942. Photo serial #2788[?](42).

Pieter Bakels
CV-8 Hornet
NS020831a
45k

USS Hornet (CV-8), closeup view, starboard side in way of island, showing altered searchlight platform access ladders, docking bridge, life raft stowages, new 20mm battery, forward boat crane removed, etc. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., Saturday, 28 February 1942. Photo serial #2789[?](42).

CV-8 Hornet
NS020831b
52k

USS Hornet (CV-8), view from island looking forward, showing forward 1.1", 20mm and 5" guns, starboard side; no. 1 1.1" director, racks for 1.1" magazines inside splinter bulwarks, etc. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., Saturday, 28 February 1942. Photo serial #2790(42).

CV-8 Hornet
NS020831
137k

USS Hornet, closeup view, after end and port side of island showing No. 3 director and foundation, altered flag bridge and primary fly control and 36" searchlight platforms, FD radar installed on 5" directors, etc. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., Saturday, 28 February 1942. Photo serial #2791[?](42).

Steve Whitby
Larger copy submitted by
Pieter Bakels
CV-8 Hornet
NS020831d
108k

USS Hornet (CV-8), forward end of island showing splinter protection for gunnery control station and sky lookout platform, SC radar antenna installed, port pelorus relocated to top of fly control. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., Saturday, 28 February 1942. Photo serial #2792(42).

Pieter Bakels
CV-8 Hornet
NS020831e
175k

At Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., Saturday, 28 February 1942.

While at Norfolk she was camouflaged to Measure 12 with splotches; colors were Navy Blue, Ocean Gray and Haze Gray. By this time Mk.4 radar had been added to the Mk.37 directors.

(Thanks to Robert Hurst and Michael Vorrasi, who provided additional info).

Original photos submitted by Steve Whitby.
Larger photos submitted by Michael Vorrasi.
CV-8 Hornet
NS020831f
142k
CV-8 Hornet
NS020831g
134k Michael Vorrasi
CV-8 Hornet
NS020860
126k

View of the flight deck and island of USS Hornet (CV-8), taken pre-Midway, in early 1942 as this is a screen capture and the film scenes show the planes to still have red centers on the star insignia as well as red & white tail stripes.

Michael Vorrasi
Doolittle Raid on Japan, April 1942
CV-8 Hornet
NS020802
18k April 1942, as she appeared in the Pacific. USN
CV-8 Hornet
NS020838
85k

Navy blimp L-8 approaches USS Hornet (CV-8) to deliver parts for the mission's B-25B aircraft. Taken shortly after the ship left San Francisco to begin the operation, circa 4 April 1942. Note package hanging below the airship.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53288).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020838a
64k

Navy blimp L-8 hovers over USS Hornet (CV-8) while delivering parts for the mission's U.S. Army Air Force aircraft. Taken shortly after the ship left San Francisco to begin the operation, circa 4 April 1942. Note USAAF B-25B bomber parked on the flight deck.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53294).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS0543305
117k

View looking aft from the island of USS Hornet (CV-8), while en route to the mission's launching point. USS Gwin (DD-433) is coming alongside, as USS Nashville (CL-43) steams in the distance. Eight of the mission's sixteen B-25B bombers are parked within view, as are two of the ship's SBD scout bombers. Note midships elevator, torpedo elevator, arresting gear and flight deck barriers in the lower portion of the photo, and 1.1" quad anti-aircraft machine gun mount at left.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53289).

Fred Weiss
CV-8 Hornet
NS020839
133k

Two of the operation's sixteen USAAF B-25B bombers, parked on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), while en route to the mission launching point.

The plane at right has tail # 40-2282. It is mission plane # 4, piloted by 2nd Lieutenant Everett W. Holstrom, Jr. during the raid, in which it attacked targets in Tokyo. Note protective cover over its gun turret, and wooden dummy guns mounted in its tail cone.

The plane at left is warming up its engines, as was done periodically during the voyage.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53290).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS0543307
124k

Crewmen work on a USAAF B-25B parked at the rear of USS Hornet's (CV-8) flight deck, while en route to the mission's launching point. USS Gwin (DD-433) is in the center, approaching the carrier from astern.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53291).

Fred Weiss
CV-8 Hornet
NS0543304
83k

USS Gwin (DD-433) approaches USS Hornet (CV-8) from astern, with USS Nashville (CL-43) beyond, while en route to the mission's launching point. The ships are framed by the tail of a USAAF B-25B, parked on the rear of the carrier's flight deck.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53292).

Fred Weiss
CV-8 Hornet
NS020839a
106k

View looking aft and to port from the island of USS Hornet (CV-8), while en route to the mission's launching point. USS Vincennes (CA-44) is in the distance.

Several of the mission's sixteen B-25B bombers are visible. That in the foreground is tail # 40-2261, which was mission plane # 7, piloted by 2nd Lieutenant Ted W. Lawson. The next plane is tail # 40-2242, mission plane # 8, piloted by Captain Edward J. York. Both aircraft attacked targets in the Tokyo area. Lt. Lawson later wrote the book "Thirty Seconds over Tokyo."

Note searchlight at left.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53293).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020839b
95k

Some of the mission's B-25B bombers parked on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), while en route to the raid's takeoff point. Note use of the flight deck tie-down strips to secure the aircraft.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53295).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020839c
136k

Army Air Forces B-25B bombers parked on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), while en route to the mission's launching point. The plane in the upper right is tail # 40-2242, mission plane # 8, piloted by Captain Edward J. York. Note use of the flight deck tie-down strips to secure the aircraft. Location is near the forward edge of the midships aircraft elevator.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 53296).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020810
122k

Lieutenant Colonel James H. Doolittle, USAAF (left front), leader of the raiding force, talks with Captain Marc A. Mitscher, USN, Commanding Officer of USS Hornet (CV-8), on board Hornet sometime before the 18 April 1942 launch of the raiding airplanes. Members of the Army Air Forces flight crews, and the wing of one of their B-25B bombers, are in the background.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-41190).

Scott Dyben
CV-8 Hornet
NS020810a
267k

Lieutenant Colonel James H. Doolittle, USAAF (front), leader of the raiding force, wires a Japanese medal to a 500-pound bomb, during ceremonies on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), shortly before his force of sixteen B-25B bombers took off for Japan. The planes were launched on 18 April 1942.

The wartime censor has obscurred unit patches of the Air Force flight crew members in the background.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-41191).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020810b
70k

Lieutenant Colonel James H. Doolittle, USAAF, wires a Japanese medal to a bomb, for "return" to its originators in the first U.S. air raid on the Japanese Home Islands, April 1942. Photographed on board USS Hornet (CV-8), shortly before LtCol. Doolittle's B-25 bombers were launched to attack Japan.

Naval Historical & Heritage Command photo (# NH 102457).

Tom Kermen
CV-8 Hornet
NS020810c
125k

Lieutenant Colonel James H. Doolittle (left front), leader of the attacking force, and Captain Marc A. Mitscher, Commanding Officer of USS Hornet (CV-8), pose with a 500-pound bomb and USAAF aircrew members during ceremonies on Hornet's flight deck, while the raid task force was en route to the launching point.

Naval Historical & Heritage Command photo (# NH 64472).

NH&HC
CV-8 Hornet
NS020824
113k North American B-25B's tied down to Hornet's deck, April 15th, 1942. Aircraft # 02298 was the 6th B-25 to take off and was flown by Lt. Dean E. Hallmark. All 16 of these aircraft were built in Inglewood, California. Steve Whitby
CV-8 Hornet
NS020825
111k Doolittle's own aircraft (Sr. No. 02344) lashed to Hornet's deck, April 16th, 1942. Steve Whitby
CV-8 Hornet
NS020833
62k

View looking aft from the island of USS Hornet (CV-8), while en route to the mission's launching point. USS Nashville (CL-43) is in the distance.

Photo taken off a 16mm film.

Image courtesy of Periscope Film
CV-8 Hornet
NS020833a
125k

View looking aft from the island of USS Hornet (CV-8), while en route to the mission's launching point. USS Nashville (CL-43) is in the distance. Eight of the mission's sixteen B-25B bombers are visible on the carrier's flight deck. Aircraft at right is tail # 40-2250, which was mission plane # 10, piloted by 2nd Lieutenant Richard O. Joyce, which attacked targets in the Tokyo area.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (#NH 53421).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020833b
90k

USAAF B-25B bombers and Navy F4F-3 fighters on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), while she was en route to the mission's launching point. Note wooden dummy machine guns in the tail cone of the B-25 at left.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (#NH 53422).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020833c
105k

USAAF B-25B bombers tied down on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), while the carrier was en route to the mission's launching point. The plane in the center (second from the camera) is tail # 40-2283. It was mission plane # 5, piloted by Captain David M. Jones, which attacked targets in the Tokyo area.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (#NH 53425).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020833e
85k

Most of Hornet's Air Group (made up of 30 F4F-4 Wildcats from VF-8, 12 SBD-3 Dauntlesses from VB-8, 12 SBD-3's from VS-8, and 10 TBD-1 Devastators from VT-8) was carried down in the hangar, but five Wildcats were kept up on deck in case they were needed in an emergency.

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020833d
102k

USAAF B-25B bombers tied down on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), while the carrier was en route to the mission's launching point. View looks aft from the rear of Hornet's island.

The plane in the foreground is tail # 40-2203 (mission plane # 9). Partially visible at far right is tail # 40-2250 (mission plane # 10). Piloted respectively by Second Lieutenants Harold F. Watson and Richard O. Joyce, these B-25s attacked targets in the Tokyo area.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (#NH 53426).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020834
30k

Nose art on B-25B "Hari Carrier" (USAAF serial # 40-2249), photographed while the plane was parked aboard USS Hornet (CV-8), en route to the raid launching point. This aircraft was mission plane # 11, piloted by Captain C. Ross Greening. It attacked targets in the Yokohama area.

Photo taken off a 16mm film.

Image courtesy of Periscope Film
CV-8 Hornet
NS020834a
89k

Nose of one of the raiding force's B-25B bombers, which is tied down on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8) while en route to the takeoff point. This aircraft is mission plane # 11 (USAAF serial # 40-2249), nicknamed "Hari Carrier" and decorated accordingly. The plane's pilot was Capt. C. Ross Greening. It attacked targets in Yokohama. Note slippage mark on the nosewheel and tire, and inscription on the wheel cover: "Inflating instructions inside — check tire pressure daily".

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command photograph (# NH 53287).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020819
41k Army Lieut. Col. James H. Doolittle, taking off from USS Hornet (CV 8), Capt. Marc A. Mitscher commanding, bombed Tokyo, the first American air strike against the Japanese homeland. Hornet's mission was kept an official secret for a year; until then President Roosevelt referred to the origin of the Tokyo raid only as "Shangri-La." USN
CV-8 Hornet
NS020820
59k

B-25s prepare to take off from USS Hornet (CV-8) on April 18, 1942. The Americans bombed the cities of Tokyo, Nagoya and Kobe.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-324199).

USN
CV-8 Hornet
NS020806
64k April 18, 1942 photo shows the Hornet encountering rough seas while preparing to launch B-25 bombers for the Doolittle Raid on Japan. The cruiser on her port is the USS Vincennes (CA-44). Both ships were transferred from the Atlantic Fleet specifically for the Doolittle Raid. USN
CV-8 Hornet
NS020806b
113k Enlarged version of photo above. Steve Whitby
CV-8 Hornet
NS020826
126k Army Air Corps and Navy enlisted personnel loading 50 Cal. ammunition aboard B-25's. Steve Whitby
CV-8 Hornet
NS020807
99k

USS Hornet (CV-8) launches Army Air Force B-25B bombers, at the start of the first U.S. air raid on the Japanese home islands, 18 April 1942. Probably the most famous photo of the ship.

NHC
CV-8 Hornet
NS020811
119k

An Army Air Forces B-25B bomber awaits the takeoff signal on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), as the raid is launched, 18 April 1942. Note Flight Deck Officer holding launch flag at right, and white stripes painted on the flight deck to guide the pilot's alignment of his plane's nose and port side wheels.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-41194).

Scott Dyben
CV-8 Hornet
NS020812
113k

An Army Air Force B-25B bomber takes off from USS Hornet (CV-8) at the start of the raid, 18 April 1942. Note men watching from the signal lamp platform at right.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-41196).

Scott Dyben
CV-8 Hornet
NS020830
78k

Color version of photo above. Inset: Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle, USAAFR, attaching Japanese medals to a 500 pound bomb to be dropped on Tokyo. The medals had been awarded to US Navy personnel before the war.

Jack Treutle
CV-8 Hornet
NS020836
56k

Not very sharp but interesting stills taken from the color movie film showing USS Hornet launching the Doolittle raid.

Pete Harlem
CV-8 Hornet
NS020836a
54k
CV-8 Hornet
NS020836b
58k
CV-8 Hornet
NS020846
95k

A USAAF B-25B bomber flies over USS Hornet (CV-8) while on its way to attack targets in Japan, just after it was launched on the morning of 18 April 1942.

Naval History & Heritage Command photograph (#NH 53419).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020846a
99k

USAAF B-25B bomber lines up for takeoff from USS Hornet (CV-8), on the morning of 18 April 1942. Note white lines painted on the flight deck, below the plane's nose and port side wheels, to guide the pilot during his takeoff run. This is the 3rd or 4th plane to be launched.

Naval History & Heritage Command photograph (#NH 53420).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020846b
70k

USAAF B-25B bombers prepare to take off from USS Hornet (CV-8), on the morning of 18 April 1942. These are the last five or six planes to be launched.

Naval History & Heritage Command photograph (#NH 53435).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CV-8 Hornet
NS020846c
224k

"Colonel Jimmy Doolittle leads his team of 16 B-25 Mitchell bombers off the heaving deck of the U.S. carrier Hornet bound for Tokyo on the morning of April 18th." Painting by aviation artist Nicolas Trudgian.

Courtesy of Nicolas Trudgian
CV-8 Hornet
NS020845
Download free PowerPoint Viewer 2003, from Microsoft® website
3.87M

Doolittle Raid, 18 April 1942.

Author unknown.

Submitted by Ralph Hiestand, Ron Reeves and Stanley Svec
CV-8 Hornet
NS020863
112k

Lieutenant Colonel James H. Doolittle, USAAF, (center) with members of his flight crew and Chinese officials in China after the 18 April 1942 attack on Japan.

Those present are (from left to right): Staff Sergeant Fred A. Braemer, Bombardier; Staff Sergeant Paul J. Leonard, Flight Engineer/Gunner; General Ho, director of the Branch Government of Western Chekiang Province; Lieutenant Richard E. Cole, Copilot; Lt.Col. Doolittle, Pilot and mission commander; Henry H. Shen, bank manager; Lieutenant Henry A. Potter, Navigator; Chao Foo Ki, secretary of the Western Chekiang Province Branch Government.

Official U.S. Army Air Forces Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History & Heritage Command (# 97502).

NH&HC.
CV-8 Hornet
NS020821
63k

USS Hornet (CV-8) arrives at Pearl Harbor after the Doolittle Raid on Japan, 30 April 1942. Two Squadron 1, 77' Elco boats, PT-28 and PT-29 are speeding by in the foreground.

NHC.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-16865).
CV-8 Hornet
NS020821a
153k Ron Titus
CV-8 Hornet
NS020832
51k

Lt. General James H. Doolittle and 25th Anniversary Plaque, U.S. Naval Air Station Alameda, 18 April 1967 (color photo taken in 1974).

"The last CO of NAS Alameda THANK GOD had the foresight in the waning days of the base to have his troops cut it off at the angle irons and put it in storage until a base museum could be established and it was eventually put on display in the old passenger terminal bldg now called the NAS Alameda Base Museum."

Photos and information thanks to Ron Jensen, via Ron Reeves
CV-8 Hornet
NS020832a
336k
CV-8 Hornet
NS020837
153k

Washington, D.C., Nov. 9, 2006 — Surviving members of the Doolittle Raiders paid tribute to the U.S. Navy and USS Hornet (CV-8) during a wreath laying ceremony at the Navy Memorial. U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Madelyn Waychoff (# 061109-F-0000X-001).

USN
CV-8 Hornet
NS020848
21k

Medal to commemorate Doolittle's Raid on Tokyo, April 18, 1942 (obverse and reverse).

Robert M. Cieri
CV-8 Hornet
NS020848a
23k
CV-8 Hornet
NS020849
148k

Native Sons of the Golden West plaque, dedicated December 7, 2007.

Robert M. Cieri
CV-8 Hornet
NS020850
268k

"Alameda and the Doolittle Raid," Alameda Sun, 14 April 2011.

Robert M. Cieri
CV-8 Hornet
NS020859
314k

"Doolittle Raiders hold reunion on Hornet," Alameda Journal, 20 October 2000.

Robert M. Cieri
CV-8 Hornet
NS020859a
299k
"Saluting the Doolittle Raid," USS Hornet Museum Living Ship Day, April 21, 2007
CV-8 Hornet
NS020856
25k

Douglas TBD Devastator, Aircraft #5 of Torpedo Squadron 8 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV-8), May 1942.

Courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com
CV-8 Hornet
NS020856a
26k

Douglas TBD Devastator, Aircraft #3 of Torpedo Squadron 8 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV-8), May 1942.

Battle of Midway, June 1942
CV-8 Hornet
NS0630801
181k

Torpedo Squadron Eight (VT-8) pilots photographed aboard USS Hornet (CV-8), circa mid-May 1942, shortly before the Battle of Midway.

They are (Front row, kneeling, left to right): Ensign Harold J. Ellison; Ensign Henry R. Kenyon; Ensign John P. Gray; Ensign George H. Gay, Jr.; Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Jeff D. Woodson; Ensign William W. Creamer; Aviation Pilot First Class Robert B. Miles.

(Back row, standing, left to right): Lieutenant James C. Owens, Jr.; Ensign E.L. Fayle; Lieutenant Commander John C. Waldron, Squadron Commanding Officer; Lieutenant Raymond A. Moore; Ensign Ulvert M. Moore; Ensign William R. Evans; Ensign Grant W. Teats; Lieutenant (Junior Grade) George M. Campbell.

Courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, MD.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 93595).

Bill Gonyo
CV-8 Hornet
NS020861
105k

Aerial view of USS Hornet (CV-8) taken from film footage shot during the Battle of Midway.

Michael Vorrasi
CV-8 Hornet
NS020851
109k

Douglas SBD Dauntless, Aircraft 11 of Bombing 8 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV-8) being manhandled across the carrier's flight-deck. Note the mixture of old-style and new-style helmets at this stage of the war, and the freshly painted white star on the Dauntless, now with no trace at all or any hint of the "red meatball," illustrating the dominance of the rising sun marking in the spring of 1942. Photo courtesy of Clayton Fisher.

Photos and text from Midway: Dauntless Victory, by Peter C. Smith.

Robert Hurst
CV-8 Hornet
NS020854
117k

An SBD-3 Dauntless of Bombing Squadron 8 (VB-8) flies right over the head of the Landing Signal Officer during the recovery aboard USS Hornet (CV-8). VB-8 operated from the carrier during the Battle of Midway on 4 June 1942, but did not locate the Japanese Fleet. Three aircraft were forced to ditch, but the six crewmen were all rescued. On 6 June 1942, elements of the squadron successfully hit the Japanese cruiser Mogami, losing one aircraft and its crew.

Robert L. Lawson photograph collection. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum, Photo No. 1996.253.647.

Mike Green
CV-8 Hornet
NS020822
61k

USS Hornet (CV-8) underway in the Southern Pacific, 15 May 1942, a week after the Battle of Coral Sea and the day before she was recalled to Pearl Harbor to prepare for the Battle of Midway.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives. (photo # 80-G-14866).

NHC
CV-8 Hornet
NS020813
122k

USS Hornet (CV-8) enters Pearl Harbor, 26 May 1942. She left two days later to take part in the Battle of Midway. Photographed from Ford Island Naval Air Station, with two aircraft towing tractors parked in the center foreground.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-66132).

Scott Dyben
CV-8 Hornet
NS020814
71k

USS Hornet (CV-8) at Pearl Harbor, 26 May 1942, just after the Battle of Coral Sea, and just before the Battle of Midway. Harbor tug Nokomis (YT-142) is underway alongside her. Note paint chipped off Hornet's waterline area by wave action while at sea.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-66129).

Scott Dyben
CV-8 Hornet
NS020827
99k Hornet tied up at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, May 27th, 1942. All three of the class, Yorktown, Enterprise and Hornet were there before departing for Midway. Steve Whitby

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"The Battle of Midway," directed by John Ford and narrated by Henry Fonda, is comprised mostly of authentic footage from the battle. This documentary, produced in 1942, won an Academy Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Award (Oscar). Then Commander (later Rear Admiral) John Ford, USNR, in civil life wrote, directed or produced more than 130 films in a career spanning four decades.

Format: MP4 (.mp4)  Duration: 18' 7"  Size: 320 x 240

Download a free MP4 player.

Another collection of footage taken by John Ford is available at Live Leak.

Courtesy of Internet Archive. Thanks to Ron Reeves for the clue.
CV-8 Hornet
NS020852
74k A Douglas TBD-1 Devastator from the ill-fated Torpedo Eight begins its take-off run off USS Hornet (CV-8). This plane was the twelfth of fifteen TBD's (probably ENS William R. Evans, Jr., A-V(N) USNR, and Ross E. Bibb, Jr., ARM3c, in T-4, BuNo 0321) launched by VT-8 on the morning of 4 June. Photo courtesy Mark Horan. Robert Hurst
CV-8 Hornet
NS020852a
180k The last Douglas TBD-1 Devastator of U.S. Torpedo Squadron (VT) 8, T-16 (BuNo 1506), flown by LCDR John C. Waldron with Horace Franklin Dobbs, CRMP, in the rear seat, taking off from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV-8) on 4 June 1942, during the Battle of Midway. Note the unstowed twin 0.30 cal mgs. Photo courtesy of Mark Horan.
CV-8 Hornet
NS020852b
58k The ill-fated Torpedo Eight, led by F4F Wildcats, forms up prior to departure from USS Hornet (CV-8) on the morning of 4 June 1942. The last known photograph of the unit in battle formation, taken by the official Hornet photographer, William B. Gibson. Photo © William B. Gibson.
CV-8 Hornet
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Presidential Unit Citation presented to Torpedo Squadron Eight "[f]or extremely heroic and courageous performance in combat during the 'Air Battle of Midway,' June 4, 1942."

This copy was given to the family of Ensign Harold J. Ellison, a pilot with Torpedo Squadron (VT) 8, who was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross.

Courtesy of the National Naval Aviation Museum via Bill Gonyo
CV-8 Hornet
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On Thursday, 4 June 1942, during operations near Midway Island, an F4F-4 Wildcat, # 3-F-24, from VF-3—USS Yorktown (CV-5)—, piloted by Ensign Daniel Sheedy, accidentally fired its .50-cal machine guns while landing on USS Hornet (CV-8). ENS Sheedy had been wounded during the battle and the controls to safe the guns had been shot out, according to eye-witness acounts. Five Hornet crewmembers were killed (one of them LT Royal R. Ingersoll II, son of ADM Royal E. Ingersoll and grandson of RADM Royal R. Ingersoll) and 20 others wounded in this accident.

See Researcher @ Large for the complete Damage Report, along with photographs and comments.

Courtesy of Tracy White, Researcher @ Large
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Ensign Charles E. Brannon, known as Charlie to his friends, was one of the pilots killed from VT-8 during the Battle of Midway. For his bravery that day he was awarded the Navy Cross and the Purple Heart posthumously. His story is one of the little told events of the Battle of Midway. He was part of a 6-crew detachment that flew from the Island of Midway instead of USS Hornet (CV-8) that day. Of the 6 TBF's that took off from Midway Island 4 June 1942 to find and attack the Japanese, only one plane made it back to Midway carrying 2 wounded crewmen and 1 killed in action. When the TBF Grumman Avenger became available, some crews of VT-8 were detached from the main squadron to train in the new plane, while the main group continued to fly the TBD Devastator off the USS Hornet. VT-8 was the first squadron in the US Navy to be able to fly the Avenger and the first to take her into combat. Most of the TBF detachment stayed in Hawaii during the battle, however 6 of the crews were sent to Midway to help bolster the defenses of the Island. ENS Brannon was one of the men hand selected for the task by LT Larsen. At 0600, 4 June 1942, Ensign Brannon and his crew (Charles E. Fair and William C. Lawe) took off from Midway to attack the Japanese. At 0700 they found them. LT Langdon K. Fieberling led his men in an attack on the ships and the rest is history. Only one plane flown by ENS Albert K. Earnest survived to tell the story of what had happened to the 6-plane force. Later the same day LCDR John C. Waldron led the main section of VT-8 in an attack on the Japanese fleet with equally grim results. Only ENS George Gay survived. His story is well-known by students of history. In 1944 a Destroyer Escort, USS Charles E. Brannon (DE-446) was commissioned, named for him.

CITATION

"The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Charles E. Brannon (0-105955), Ensign, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Torpedo Plane of Torpedo Squadron EIGHT (VT-8), embarked from Naval Air Station Midway during the 'Air Battle of Midway,' against enemy Japanese forces on 4 and 5 June 1942. In the first attack against an enemy carrier of the Japanese invasion fleet, Ensign Brannon pressed home his attack in the face of withering fire from enemy Japanese fighters and anti-aircraft forces. Because of events attendant upon the Battle of Midway, there can be no doubt that he gallantly gave up his life in the service of his country. His courage and utter disregard for his own personal safety were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country."

Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 310 (January 1943)"

Bill Gonyo
CV-8 Hornet
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Victor Alan Lewis was born in Sommerville, Massachusetts, to Mr. and Mrs. Murry Lewis of 245 Allen Street, Randolph, Massachusetts, on August 2, 1919. He graduated from Stetson High School in Randolph, and attended Springfield College, where he was active in athletics, including varsity track and gymnastics. He also coached track, swimming, tennis, and gymnastics. He enlisted in the United States Navy Reserve as a Seaman second class at Squantum Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Boston, Massachusetts, February 17, 1941. In April 1941, he was transferred to Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida, where he accepted an appointment as Aviation Cadet. He did advanced flight training at Jacksonville and Miami and was designated Naval Aviator on December 1st, 1941. He was promoted to Ensign with a date of rank of October 14, 1941. He was transferred to Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Virginia, for further training with Advanced Carrier Training Group, Atlantic Fleet. In February 1942, he was assigned to Torpedo Squadron 8 aboard USS Hornet (CV-8) in the Pacific area. Ensign Lewis was reported as missing in action on June 4th, 1942, during the Battle of Midway, along with his radioman AM3c Nelson L. Carr and turret gunner EM3c John W. Mehltretter. He was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross and Purple Heart. The John C. Butler-class Destroyer Escort USS Lewis (DE-535) was named and commissioned in his honor on 5 September 1944.

CITATION

"The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Ensign Victor Alan Lewis (NSN: 0-106252), United States Naval Reserve, for extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Torpedo Plane of Torpedo Squadron EIGHT (VT-8), embarked from Naval Air Station Midway during the 'Air Battle of Midway,' against enemy Japanese forces on 4 and 5 June 1942. In the first attack against an enemy carrier of the Japanese invasion fleet, Ensign Lewis pressed home his attack in the face of withering fire from enemy Japanese fighters and anti-aircraft forces. Because of events attendant upon the Battle of Midway, there can be no doubt that he gallantly gave up his life in the service of his country. His courage and utter disregard for his own personal safety were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country."

General Orders: Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 313 (April 1943)
Action Date: 4-Jun-42
Service: Naval Reserve
Rank: Ensign
Company: Torpedo Squadron 8 (VT-8)
Division: Naval Air Station, Midway

Bill Gonyo
CV-8 Hornet
NS020853
62k USS Hornet (CV-8) at the Battle of Midway, with F4F Wildcats aft on her flight deck. Heavy cruiser USS Vincennes (CA-44) is to the right, and light, anti-aircraft cruiser USS Atlanta (CL-51) in the foreground. U.S. Navy photo. Robert Hurst
CV-8 Hornet
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The Japanese "heavy cruiser IJNS Mikuma after heavy air attacks by SBDs from USS Enterprise and USS Hornet on 6 June 1942. This photograph was taken from the Hornet's combat file (serial 0018) and shows smoke from three different bomb hits pouring away from her. This photograph has never been published before and is also the only one that shows the two destroyers IJNS Arashio and IJNS Asashio in position upwind of the crippled ship in her last hours. Photo courtesy NARA, Washington DC."

Photos and text from Midway: Dauntless Victory, by Peter C. Smith.

Robert Hurst
CV-8 Hornet
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Ensign George H. Gay at Pearl Harbor Naval Hospital, with a nurse and a copy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin newspaper featuring accounts of the Battle of Midway. He was the only survivor of the 4 June 1942 Torpedo Squadron Eight (VT-8) TBD torpedo plane attack on the Japanese carrier force. Gay's book Sole Survivor indicates that the date of this photograph is probably 7 June 1942, following an operation to repair his injured left hand and a meeting with Admiral Chester W. Nimitz.

Official U.S. Navy photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (# 80-G-17678).

Naval History & Heritage Command
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Ensign George H. Gay (left) and Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Elbert S. McCuskey, with the latter's F4F-4 Wildcat fighter, June 1942, following the Battle of Midway. Note seven "victory" flags painted below the cockpit. Ensign Gay was the sole Battle of Midway aircrew survivor of USS Hornet's Torpedo Squadron Eight. During the battle, McCuskey served with USS Yorktown's Fighting Squadron Three.

Courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, MD.

Naval History & Heritage Command photo (# NH 90482).

Naval History & Heritage Command
CV-8 Hornet + ACV-1 Long Island
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Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Territory of Hawaii. View looking eastward from over Pearl City, with Ford Island in the middle of the view and Diamond Head in the distant center, 1 August 1942.

USS Long Island (AVG-1) and USS Hornet (CV-8) are moored along Ford Island's western side, protected by anti-torpedo nets. The capsized hull of USS Utah (AG-16), a victim of the 7 December 1941 Japanese air raid, is astern of Long Island.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of The Honorable James V. Forrestal.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 83996).

Naval History & Heritage Command
CV-8 Hornet
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USS Hornet (CV-8) with her post-Midway refit modifications. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, late July or early August 1942.

Michael Vorrasi
Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 1942
CV-8 Hornet
NS020808
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A Japanese Type 99 shipboard bomber (Allied codename "Val") trails smoke as it dives toward USS Hornet (CV-8), during the morning of 26 October 1942. This plane struck the ship's stack and then her flight deck. A Type 97 shipboard attack plane ("Kate") is flying over Hornet after dropping its torpedo, and another "Val" is off her bow. Note anti-aircraft shell burst between Hornet and the camera, with its fragments striking the water nearby.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-33947).

Scott Dyben
CV-8 Hornet
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Damage to the smokestack and signal bridge of USS Hornet (CV-8) after it was struck by a crashing Japanese dive bomber, during the morning of 26 October 1942. Smoke at bottom is from fires started when the plane subsequently hit the flight deck. Note ship's tripod mast, with CXAM radar antenna in top left and the flag still flying above the damaged structure.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives (photo # 80-G-40300).

Scott Dyben
CV-8 Hornet
NS020805
83k October 26 1942, Hornet fatally wounded and listing hard to starboard. The destroyer is taking off her crew. USN
CV-8 Hornet, CA-26 Northampton
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USS Northampton (CA-26), at right, attempting to tow USS Hornet (CV-8) after she had been disabled by Japanese air attacks on 26 October 1942.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (# 80-G-33897).

Scott Dyben
CV-8 Hornet
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October 26 1942, Hornet in tow. Cruiser Northampton (CA-26) made three attempts to take the carrier in tow, but additional Japanese attacks frustrated these efforts.

The "X" above the bridge and the CXAM radar antenna indicates where T.R. Archer was wounded by a Japanese dive bomber in a suicide attack (see photos "020808" and "020809", above).

From the collection of Chief Parachute Rigger, Theo. R. Archer, USN Retired. Contributed by his son, Bill Archer.
CV-8 Hornet
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October 26 1942, Hornet being abandoned.

From the collection of Chief Parachute Rigger, Theo. R. Archer, USN Retired. Contributed by his son, Bill Archer.
CV-8 Hornet
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October 26 1942, Hornet being abandoned. About 900 crewmen had been transferred to accompanying destroyers when, at 1523, Hornet took another torpedo on her starboard side. At 1550 the order to abandon ship was passed.

From the collection of Chief Parachute Rigger, Theo. R. Archer, USN Retired. Contributed by his son, Bill Archer.
CV-8 Hornet
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Chief Parachute Rigger, Theo. R. Archer, USN, on flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), 1942. He was on her from commission till sunk.

From the collection of Chief Parachute Rigger, Theo. R. Archer, USN Retired. Contributed by his son, Bill Archer.
Models

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Model on display at the National Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola, Florida. Photos taken on 13 June 2008.

Photos by Judson Phillips

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USS Hornet in the Movies

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Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (MGM, 1944) is based on Lt Col James H. Doolittle's raid on Japan, in April 1942. The film, noted for its accurate depitcion of the historical details of the raid and its use of actual wartime footage of the bombers in some flying scenes, was directed by Mervyn LeRoy. The screenplay, by Dalton Trumbo, is based on the book (1943) of the same title by Capt Ted W. Lawson (a pilot who participated in the raid) and Robert Considine. The film stars Spencer Tracy as Lieutenant Colonel Doolittle, Van Johnson as Captain Lawson, Phyllis Thaxter as his wife, and Tim Murdock, Scott McKay, Gordon McDonald, Don DeFore, Robert Mitchum, John R. Reilly and Horace McNally.

Tom Kermen.

It is believed that the use of a scaled-down, low-resolution image of this poster to provide commentary on the film, hosted on a server in the United States by a non-commercial organization (NavSource) qualifies as fair use under U.S. copyright law.

For more photos of this ship, see:

View the USS Hornet (CV-8)
DANFS History entry located on the Hazegray & Underway Web Site.

Crew Contact and Reunion Information
Date: September 9–14, 2014
Place: Hilton Double Tree-Airport Hotel
37 NE Loop 410 (McCullough)
San Antonio, TX, 78216-
(210) 366-2424
Contact: Carl & Sandy Burket, Secretary
Address: P.O. Box 108
Roaring Spring, PA 16673-
Phone: (814) 224-5063
Fax: (814) 224-0078
E-mail: hornetcva@aol.com
Web site: USS Hornet Museum Archives
Remarks: USS Hornet (CV-8, CV, CVA, CVS-12) 66th Reunion.
All Ship’s Company, Officers, Air Groups, Crew, Marines and their Families Welcomed.

Related Links
Hazegray & Underway World Aircraft Carrier Pages By Andrew Toppan.
Official U.S. Navy Carrier Website
USS Hornet Association Inc.
USS Hornet Museum
"They Held the Line: The USS Yorktown CV-5, USS Enterprise CV-6 and USS Hornet CV-8," "Part Two the Hornet", an article by Father Steve Dundas

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Last update: 25 January 2014